The City of Newport takes steps to be the first smart city in the midwest

Newport unveils the first smartLINK in the Midwest

Leaders from The City of Newport and smartLINK celebrate the first node. Photo courtesy of NKY Tribune

Leaders from The City of Newport and smartLINK celebrate the first node. Photo courtesy of NKY Tribune

The City of Newport, smartLINK (powered by Nexigen,) and Regional Smart Cities partners have taken steps to deploy the first smart city solutions in the Midwest. Newport is home to the first smartLINK kiosks that will act as a foundational layer for smart planning throughout the region. Already, groups from University of Cincinnati, Northern Kentucky University, CONFLUENCE, and dozens of other private and public organizations are teaming up to tackle regional growth - collaboratively. 

 

Midwest leaders are ahead of smart city trends

A few local businesses including Astronomer, Cincinnati Bell, and Venture Smarter join smartLINK in leading the smart cities charge across sectors as the Ohio, Kentucky, and Indiana cohort "Smart Cincy" is helping to build the first [true] smart region.

Regional Smart Cities Initiatives launch at The Smart Cincy Summit this April. Details: smartcincy.org.

Regional Smart Cities Initiatives launch at The Smart Cincy Summit this April. Details: smartcincy.org.

Public and private leaders are working to democratize smart planning with a focus on the four pillars of smart cities: connectivity, mobility, security, and sustainability. Partners joining forces to create the Regional Smart Cities brain-trust have pieced together the first sets of smart city planning standards in an effort to time compress smart growth. Regional Smart Cities efforts are rooted in the idea that connectivity comes first, and acts as the gateway to sustainable growth.

The City of Newport, The City of Hamilton, and other area municipalities seem to agree as they have all taken steps in developing smart connectivity solutions ahead of major smart city deployments. This 'City as a Lab' approach is agile and dynamic, not to mention unique. Universities champion research efforts, municipalities focus on planning efforts, and private sector leaders solve problems relative to smart growth. It's no easy task, but efforts in the Midwest are well underway.

View: Regional Smart Cities Initiative

 

What's special about "planning standards" and "nodes!?"

1. A set or sets of standards will allow municipalities to better work with vendors to provide best case solutions for residents of smart cities. Devices will realize compatbility, data will be dissimenated and usable, and the four pillars of smart cities will contribute to the growth of smart regions and an improved quality of life for residents.

2. smartLINK's scalable, modular nodes allow various sensors to test anything from air quality to the mood of a passer-by. Most immediately, testing is taking place to gauge civic engagement, to test for parking and traffic solutions, and to measure for environmental studies and hyper-targeted surveys. 

ALSO READ: Midwest leaders create a brain-trust for smart growth

 

What's next?

Interested in learning more about Regional Smart Cities efforts? Join us at an upcoming round-table or attend The Smart Cincy Summit in April. Questions? Email hello@smartcincy.org.

  • February 22nd - Connectivity & Security round-table @ UpTech
  • March 15th - Mobility & Sustainability round-table @ Hamilton Mill
  • April 25th - Smart Cincy Summit @ Union Hall

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