Smart Cincy Phase 1: WiFi + Collaboration (Recap of RFQ Released March 21, 2017)

Scroll down to read a recap and summary of the 26 page document released today meant to act as the foundational layer of smart city planning throughout the City of Cincinnati. Click "View RFQ" to view the entire document from the Entrepreneurship and Education Committee.

We have a vision that we want to achieve for our citizens, and now we’re looking for innovators, builders and doers who can make that vision a reality. The collaboration starts now.
— City of Cincinnati Smart Cities Phase One RFQ
Join elected officials, academic and business leaders, and community members committed to smart city solutions at the Smart Cincy Summit on April 25th. The Summit will be held the week after final questions are due for the RFQ and the week before final responses are due. 

Join elected officials, academic and business leaders, and community members committed to smart city solutions at the Smart Cincy Summit on April 25th. The Summit will be held the week after final questions are due for the RFQ and the week before final responses are due. 

 

City of Cincinnati - Smart Cincy
Request for Qualifications,
Smart Cities Initiative Phase 1: "Deployment of WiFi and/or Wireline Broadband Systems Throughout the City of Cincinnati"

CINCINNATI, Ohio (March 21, 2017) -- Cincinnati wants to deploy high-speed Internet connectivity throughout the city, and it means business.

On Tuesday, City Manager Harry Black, Assistant City Manager Sheila Hill-Christian, and Chief Procurement Officer Patrick Duhaney announced the issuance of a request for qualifications, or RFQ, for the first phase of deployment of what they envision will become a city-wide network of WiFi and wired broadband systems.

“The City desires to leverage its infrastructure and the public rights-of- way to establish a technologically neutral platform for new and innovative services that will continue to fuel the city’s economic growth,” the RFQ states. “We want your help to lay the groundwork for a smart-city grid in Cincinnati, that is useful, cost effective, and opens doors to future innovations to benefit our citizens.”

The initial phase would be deployed along the 3.6 mile-long Cincinnati Bell Connector route, which would “serve as the backbone for a network that courses through the City Center from the Banks to Findlay Market in Over-the- Rhine,” according to the RFQ.

The city sees providing Internet connectivity through partnerships with private industry as foundational for becoming a smart city. “We see the proliferation of wired and wireless connections as the ignition for economic growth, a means to improve public safety, a tool to power efficient governance, and the bridge to span the digital divide,” according to the RFQ.

The city could enter into one or several public-private partnerships to make this happen. The city is offering potential partner businesses low- to no-cost access to city infrastructure, including more than 12,000 poles, street lights, traffic signals, and other structures in the rights-of- way along the Connector route.

The city wants partnerships to include a revenue-sharing model that would provide wired and wireless Internet service to the city’s residents, businesses and visitors “at commercially competitive speeds in highly trafficked areas,” according to the RFQ.

Additionally, the city wants cost-free Internet access for targeted city buildings, public spaces, schools, community centers, and residences where connectivity is unavailable due to lack of access or affordability. Internet connectivity would ideally be provided at speeds exceeding 1 gigabyte per second to each residential unit within the deployment area, and businesses would receive speeds at least equal to that.

“We want innovative communications initiatives to be tested and made available to our residents and businesses,” according to the RFQ, “and we want to provide key resources and a friendly environment to those who want to share and push forward our vision.”

The city is building on steps it took last year toward becoming a “smart-city visionary,” when it developed guidelines for the rapid deployment of 5G-and- beyond connectivity on streetlights and utility poles. The guidelines were developed by city experts in collaboration with the wireless industry.

Pushing forward that vision would eventually mean a “City-wide network of multiple, interconnected networks, constructed independently over time by multiple network operators,” according to the RFQ.

Before allowing service providers to submit proposals, the city is soliciting statements of qualifications, or SOQs. The city will invite qualified respondents that have “the capability, capacity, experience and qualifications” to make the city’s vision a reality. SOQs are due May 5. The city is holding a pre-submittal meeting on April 11, and has set a deadline of April 18 for the submission of written questions about the RFQ by respondents.

“We have a vision that we want to achieve for our citizens, and now we’re looking for innovators, builders and doers who can make that vision a reality,” the RFQ states. “The collaboration starts now.”

JOIN US AT THE SMART CINCY SUMMIT ON APRIL 25th

>> Tickets & Info
>> Registration & Resources
>> Smart Cities Initiative Overview